Death Penalty

26Feb07

George W. Bush (r), (Incumbent, Will not Run in ’08)

G. Bush’s initial 2000 Presidential campaign encountered a hellish time in trying to destroy Bush’s reputation as the “chief executive of the Texas killing industry.” Hundreds of activists blamed Bush for Texas’ U.S. leading rate of inmates put to death.

Within the first 100 days of his first term, Bush also authorized the first federal death penalty sentences since the 1960’s.

Through all this, he has maintained that he feels all his death sentences were justified, and that the death penalty is a necessary and useful deterrent for crime, and violent crime in particular.

The Bottom Line__

What he says: Death penalty is a necessary evil

What his actions say: Death penalty is a necessary evil which he has perhaps over-utilized

Hillary Clinton (d), (Candidate, ’08)

In yet another issue about which she is opposed to the liberal image right wing activists have painted for her, H. Clinton is an advocate of the death penalty.

She has supported bills requiring DNA testing prior to executions, but at base, with full evidence, she would not oppose death as a penalty for a crime. As the year goes by, it will be interesting to see how, and if, Clinton tries to present her death penalty views in a more liberal light, especially considering some left wing activists are growing tired of her more moderate than desirable views on other issues.

The Bottom Line__

What she says: Enforce DNA testing, but pro death penalty

What her actions say: Enforce DNA testing, but pro death penalty

John McCain (r), (Candidate, ’08)

Though many right wing activists have complained about J. McCain’s moderate views on a variety of issues, they really do not have much of a problem with his stance on the death penalty. And with good reason; McCain is considered a staunch advocate.

Among many things, McCain has voted affirmatively concerning stricter enforcement of the death penalty, limitations on death row appeals, and limiting product liability punitive damage awards.

McCain has quite a few bridges to build in his attempt to reach out to the “far” right as his campaign progresses, but his stand on the death penalty should remain firm from here on out, with no gentle “easing” to one side or another required.

The Bottom Line__

What he says: Has made conflicting statements

What his actions say: Pro-death penalty, for stricter enforcing, less appeal success

Barack Obama (d), (Candidate, ’08)

Since his days as a lawmaker, B. Obama has been an opponent of the death penalty. Through passing legislation requiring the video recording of all questioning and confession to prevent fraud, Obama has showed his willingness to act on his anti-death penalty principles.

This is a relief to many left wing activists seeking a candidate who stands by traditional left wing values. Obama was a co-sponsor of the comprehensive reform of Illinois’ criminal system, the reverberations of which have been felt in other states across the country.

One of his focuses in place of the death penalty has been rehabilitation of criminals including through such projects as “boot camps.”

The Bottom Line__

What he says: Anti-death penalty

What his actions say: Anti-death penalty, has done numerous legislative work backing this stance

Rudy Giuliani (r), (Candidate, ’08)

Having run for offices under the Democratic flag, the Republican flag, and his own independent flag in the past, one does not have much basis on which to guess where R. Giuliani would stand on the issue of the death penalty, nor has he made it clear where he stands through his speeches.

A former federal prosecutor known for tracking down criminals very effectively, and also known as the man who cleaned up crime in New York, Giuliani has deemed the death penalty an appropriate punishment for those in the mold of John Walker Lindh who committed “treason against the United States in a time of peril.”

The Bottom Line__

What he says: Unknown, more developments will arise as he finalizes his platform

What his actions say: Does believe that certain situations warrant punishment by death

John Edwards (d), (Candidate, ’08)

J. Edwards was at odds with his running mate J. Kerry during their 2004 Presidential campaign; Kerry was of the opinion that the death penalty should be reserved only for those who engage in acts of terrorism. Edwards, on the other hand, has stated that there are crimes other than terrorism which do warrant issue of this ultimate punishment.

Edwards has said in the past, “he favors the death penalty but [is] opposed its unfair administration.” A relatively clear statement, it will definitely serve as a somewhat negative factor in his bid to become the outright “left” candidate, with many considering H. Clinton too moderate, and B. Obama too liberal.

The Bottom Line__

What he says: Favors the death penalty

What his actions say: Favors the death penalty

Mitt Romney (r), (Candidate, ’08)

M. Romney reinstated the death penalty in Massachusetts in 2005, and is considered an advocate. This is in compliance with his right wing platform.

Unlike his view on gay marriage- which he mysteriously re-opened debate on at the end of his governor term in Massachusetts, the only state permitting gay marriage- his stance on the death penalty is considered far more firm, and not as impacted by the upcoming election.

The Bottom Line__

What he says: Pro- death penalty

What his actions say: Pro- death penalty

Advertisements


4 Responses to “Death Penalty”

  1. Really an excellent way to present the candidates views on important issues. It will be very interesting to see if a “shifting” of views takes place as the 2008 campaign progresses.
    Hope you will be able to track the flip flops and shifts in positions.

  2. Really an excellent way to present the candidates views on important issues. It will be very interesting to see if a “shifting” of views takes place as the 2008 campaign progresses.
    Hope you will be able to track the flip flops and shifts in positions should they occur.

  3. Good point David and thanks for the comment. Major shifts (ie switching stance entirely) from this point on would basically be campaign suicide, but we will definitely see those subtle shifts to strengthen positions, and I’ll surely document those carefully.

  4. 4 iqrrj

    Good site!!!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: